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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
for republican governors. it's a move gone all over the country. >> best politician bill clinton, who in a single speech at the democratic national convention injected energy and enthusiasm into the voters. >> herman cain was the leading republican contender. however, he was also the worst politician, but i'll get to that later. >> i had a long shot in naming chris christie because he firmed up his base in a democratic state. and i think at a time when the republicans now are seeing a resurgence among their moderates. i think in the long run he may prove to be the big winner of the year. >> these are all very interesting choices but they are all domestic. the best politician of 2012 was german chancellor angela merkle. she had to walk a tightrope between her german voters who do not favor bailing out europe and the european union. best politician, angela. you got it? you can write that down. pat, put it in your column. worst politician. >> susan rice. she was fed these phony talking points by the cia. she went on a defensive. and president obama left her, john, twisting slowly, slowly in the wind
to increase any tax rates. how can it be that we have the rates the president is proposing back in the clinton years and the had the longest period of uninterrupted growth in the nation's history, 23 million jobs created, would balance the budget and were paying down the debt. if those tax rates are so needed to job creation, how is it that we have those very rates that the country was doing the best it has ever done? how can it be? the ideological rigidity is not fact-based. it is not fact-based. one of the things they are saying now is that if you go to a top rate of 39.6, that will have enormous consequences on economic growth. cbo has studied that issue. they have told us it would change economic growth by 1/10 of 1%. extending the tax cut would add -- extending all the middle class tax cuts would add 1.3% to economic growth. the overwhelming driver here is extending tax relief for the middle class. at least those making below $250,000. i go to another issue. there are income tax rates currently at 35% tax rate. what about people who are paying a rate of 15%? -- how about the unearned whe
of womanizing. for example bill clinton was not the first and bill clinton was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior in high office. there's a long history of it and arnold schwarzenegger and john edwards, david petraeus had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read for example letters written by martha washington going to the winter camp, she didn't complain about the weather. she didn't complain about the harsh conditions but she did complain about one thing. there was a was a tomcat one winter that was misbehaving and it was noisy and kept her awake at night so she nicknamed the tomcat alexander hamilton. because of all the young girls will come into the camp. i also did a book a few years ago called life in the white house about the presidents and these. what hobbies do they have? what were their fears and hopes and what did they -- or were they like his fathers and husbands as another way of stressing presidential characters providing us with another lens. we are all still trying to figure out -- and for example nixon in his free time like to bowl alone and sometimes wore a blac
the number of investigations especially of the clinton administration. what do you see as your legacy of that tenure? >> i think bill clinton, president clinton and secretary as secretary -- hilary as secretary of state do not like me very much. i was chair of the government oversight committee during the time we were investigating whitewater and we were investigating campaign contributions that came from sources outside the united states and from various people. there was an awful lot to that. we had people testifying like ohnny chonung, they had contributed money to gain favor with the white house. and they came into the kitchen at hong kong and said we wonder -- we like your president and we want to contribute to his campaign. the man who said that was the equivalent of the cia. these were people who were under oath and swore to this and we also had over 100 people take the fifth amendment or flee the country. there was a lot there. that is not to say that president clinton did not do some good things. he worked with newt gingrich and we got out from under some difficult financial
was 78 years old. >> secretaries day hillary clinton is heading back to work next week. clinton's been working from home while recovering from a concussion she suffered after fainting while fighting a stomach virus. >> her return to the state farm is likely to be good news for capitol hill. clinton will testify next move for the congressional committee of the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. >> genetics and 20 the investigation is the sandy hook elementary school shooting massacre. >> the state medical examiner would do a complete analysis of government-that the gunman as dna. they're not looking for anything specific in the analysis and it is on likely they will find genetic clue into lanes as motive behind the shooting. >> genetics said they're genetic component to mental illness but there are many genes involved, not just a single gene or mutation. results of the dna analysis are not expected for several weeks. >> here is a live look outside at this and tell bridge coming up on kron 4 morning news a new addition to the oakland police department to help reduce crime a
't are particulars. you know, the whole notion of bill clinton saying that he never inhaled -- well when jay leno asked the president about it, you know, without going overboard -- my book documented thoroughly. that is what they did. you know, they had a thing called total absorption, but not only did you inhale, but everything in the car as you were smoking it. there are few people there of african students, one of the african-americans and some others started calling him rocco, when i was with a ton of what's his name. with so many college students, they start to really go back and find their identities. that is what he is searching for. some people call him barry instead of barack. >> host: why did he choose occidental reign. >> guest: he chose it because there was a girl that he met in brentwood before that time. and so he wanted to go for that reason. occidental was like the next that. it was late in comfortable, a very bucolic, small and contained place. it was very comfortable. he really started to expand intellectually. i think he got his first defense of destiny during those two years.
. george h.w. burks 137. bill clinton, 167. george w. bush, 173. and then president obama through november 5 2012, i guess the day of the election, had 311 -- 3 10789 why such a jump between president carter and president obama? is it just the cost of running these campaigns? is it television ads? writes all this money going if guest: it's a very good question. if you want to understand what presidents do, you have to think about what the rules of the system are that incentivize their action. so the rise in fundraising is really a story about the consequence of campaign reform. if you want to empty your let to a presidential candidate, you could give them $25,000. over the last few decades, campaign costs have exploded. the rational is that -- rationale is that we want to have small amount offense money to limit corruption or the appearance of corruption. so the idea is if i can only get a certain amount of money from you, and every person i know, i'm not going to be behold on every certain but with rising president costs, the president is spending more time raising more and more money. th
advisory board and also was president clinton how usual is this cell that we're hearing about? >> you know, candy, while there is a discussion, there was a statement put out by the emirates, we don't know very much about the details. typically the emirates is an infrastructure place, right? it's where they provide support, the terrorist groups look for support that counter pro live rag, banking. we don't often see operational terrorist cells and that's what makes this different. the emirates has a capable counterterrorism force and work very closely with saudi arabia and we have to presume that there was real cooperation because the targets were supposed to be in the emirates and saudi arabia but we don't know much beyond that. >> you know, i want to get this quote exactly right. this is from the official em rate news agency and materials aiming to conduct terrorist attacks. so this is not a region that you want people exporting material and equipment for terrorist attacks. how concerning is that part of the operation? >> it's very concerning. in fact, the statement itself suggests that th
that william jefferson clinton is william jefferson clinton. [laughter] by the way, president clinton is still campaigning somewhere. [laughter] i don't know how anyone's going to tell him we voted. maybe he's already starting on the next one. i want to talk a little bit, we -- jefferson, the politician, jefferson, the renaissance man, jeff the symbol -- jefferson, the symbol, you know, secessionists wanted a piece of him in the run-up to the civil war, frank lib roosevelt -- franklin roosevelt wanted him in the runup to world war ii. he can be used in any way you need partly because he was so articulate and so prolific. 20,000 or more letters, brilliantly written, wonderfully eloquent. so what can we make of him? this is, this ises the man, the human being we have, you know, and that's what i always want to get to. answering president kennedy's question, what was he like. in the service of trying to figure this out, i asked for and was granted permission to sleep in jefferson's bedroom one night on a pallet on the floor, i hasten to add. [laughter] and wanted to hear how the clock sounded. je
the discussions were all about. secretary clinton was about to come into town for the strategic and economic dialogue. we felt no pressure to resolve this case and get them out of the embassy before she arrived. we had to make sure that he felt comfortable with whatever terms and conditions under which you would leave the embassy. and if not, we're prepared to have him be our guest and reside at the embassy for many many years. at one. he did not agree to the conditions offered by the chinese government. he said no. at that point, we started turning around and focusing on him being a resident for quite some time. >> would that have been possible? >> would have been difficult, but he would not have been able to roam the grounds freely because many parts of it are off-limits, even to some of the workers. who would pay for his, for instance, communications? in the old days you had a telephone, may be a land line, and newspapers. but now you have got the internet. how would he be able to communicate with the outside world? those things were issues that we started investigating, and trying to dev
. in 1993, president clinton presented him the presidential medal of freedom. this bareboned account of sargent shriver's life achievement suggests but does not describe the spirit of a man that was a devout catholic and inspired and inspiring father. how can we understand this. and the motivation of such a first kyl and resilient man. striving to understand sargent shriver, i think of the inflated clown toy perhaps two and a half or 3 feet tall favored by 2-year-olds around the world and at the bottom end of the way there is a bag of sand so that no matter how often you push him down, she springs back upright again. it's fun if you are two but sargent shriver was like that his whole life, no matter how long the circumstances pushed him down. rather in the fight to is to ambush the peace corps or the vice presidential nominations for ten, threatened or the war on poverty derails become the dismal electoral rebuffs in 1972 or the dauntless alzheimer's no matter how many times he got pushed out he came around upright again and he soldiered on ever the optimist and ever the visionary. w
has is that your approval rating. the outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton is also popular with a 66 percent approval rating. >> a new gallup poll shows a majority of americans report stricter gun laws that stashed support stricter gun laws. the most are against banning assault weapons. >> 58 percent of americans now say that for stricter gun laws. >> that is up from 43% october 2011. >> the american public is now split on enforcing existing laws that passing new ones. >> 46% of the public was to enforce karloff 47 percent want new legislation. >> the specific law to ban assault weapons which is backed by president obama is not gain much support october 10th. 44 percent support on assault weapons ban, while 51 percent are against it. >> the u.s. state department is criticizing a bill passed by russia's parliament to ban american from adopting russian children. president vladimir putin says he will sign the measure. >> he says the bill is a response to a new u.s. law that calls for sanctions against russians were found to be violating human rights. >> the state pardons as am
command there. general schwarzkopf was 78 years old. >> secretary of state hillary clinton is heading back to work next week. she has been working from home while recovering from a concussion she suffered after fainting while fighting a stomach virus. her return to the state department's likely to be good news for capitol hill. glenn will testify next month before the congressional committee committee on the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. russian president vladimir q and has signed a bill today banning americans from adopting russian children. the law also blocks dozens of russian children who are currently in the adoption process by american families from leaving the country. houston says the bill as retaliation for an american law that calls for action against russian officials who were found guilty of violating human rights. more than 60,000 russian children have been adopted by american families in the past two decades. >> opening bell on this friday it looks like dow futures are lower once again. the dow's down the 150. there was news that the house of representative
to go over the cliff, have the automatic sequester cuts, take the tax increases, go back to the clinton era rates and that when the economy reacts, as it most certainly will, negatively, then he will blame the republicans for putting us into a recession. david: let's put a fine point on that. what we are suggesting here, they call it an outrageous suggestion, that the president is willing to send this country into a recession to get what he wants. you are really saying that? >> i think that he is willing to gamble. i believe that the president and his advisors have looked at the history of congress and they know that when we get a major market of bed, large drop in the stock market, any other reaction from the economy, that those members of congress will immediately concede. it is the same exact process that happened with tarp back in 2008. if you really look at it, what got us to where we are now to that debt ceiling of august 2011, in that case, we had the booties downgrade. it was sufficient to have everyone embrace as a posture idea. david: at one point, speaker boehner was in a mee
slipped in a prison hospital bathroom earlier this month. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton sidelined no more. her spokesman says she will be back at work next week after spending the past three weeks fighting off what the state department said was a stomach flu and a concussion brought on by a fainting spell. doctors have grounded her from overseas travel for a few more weeks. her return means she may soon testify before congress about that attack on the u.s. diplomatic office in bengahzi. >>> hopefully bart, the hound dog, won't be sniffing around lake erie any more this winter. he slipped through the ice and his front paws were the only thing that kept him through the surface. his owner tried to help him, but he slipped through, too. >> i was talking to him. trying to keep him warm, rub him. get flood flowing through his body. i kind of looked at it like what if it was my dog? >> they spent about 90 minutes in the frigid water before rescuers arrived. bart was cold but otherwise okay. >>> america watched as paul mccartney, bon jovi and bruce springsteen took the stage to raise mone
presidents, president clinton, bush and obama said that nuclear iran is unacceptable. if the iranians are allowed to walk across that threshold with no opposition, that would demonstrat demonstrates other would-be regimes that-- >> is this the year for the showdown on iran? >> simply as a matter of industrial mechanics, how much uranium you need to enrich to get to a bomb this is the year. >> paul: we've been saying that for a while and somehow there's a computer virus that happens that keeps kicking it down. but it's not an ever receding horizon and the international atomic energy looks at iran as nuclear some piles, how much they have and how deeply -- look, you saw benjamin netanyahu at the u.n. in september draw literally a red line and they've come to consensus grew late in the spring of 2013 you're going to have that threshold. >> paul: matt, you've been the optimist in our group on the arab spring and made a strong case for it particularly after the dictatorships for so many decades in that part of the world. give us some reason to think that this could turn out better than it
ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-third less. we've increased the size of the government by over 33%. gregg:er hereby announce you king for a day. you're it. >> oh, please. but that's it. we're spending too much and the only way to afford this kind of spending is to tax everyone. and that's what i'm worried about. we're moving toward a value-added tax. gregg: brian wesbury, good to see you. thanks so much. >> good to see you, gregg. patti ann: greg says he can have the power. can i be queen? gregg: you may. >> this is great story. a man loses a ring on the highway and another person finds it. he is looking for the rightful owner. i hope you're watching! we'll tell you how you can help coming up. >>> a touching story of a fifth grader and how he decided to honor the victims in newtown, connecticut. >> when i heard about sandy hook i felt really bad for all the
is hard to measure. bill clinton signed in my nutrition bill for school breakfasts, to bring breakfasts to elementary schools, all kids, not just poor children. it was a study to prove that -- to prove something we know absolutely but it had to get proven scientifically. children who come to school with a full stomach or fed at school do way better in their studies and in their attendance and in their attitude and we proved it without a doubt. after three years, it because great study and it is there on the shelf but we can't afford to do anything about it. we're not going to see every elementary student -- kids eat at home but they eat pop tarts, elementary children. my kids eat breakfast. but we have to feed our children so they can think. >> 20 years ago when you first came to congress, you became known as the former welfare recipient who is now a member of congress. first of all, tell us, remind us why you were on welfare for a while. what do you think of that? >> well, i was on welfare because when my children were 1, 3, 5 years old, their father was diagnosed manic depressant and
and lower middle class people. so, if everybody says let's go back to the clinton tax rates, that is the clinton tax rates. also, on more spending, the iraq war, we pulled the people out. on c-span about two months ago i turned it on a senate armed services committee. one not seen anybody report this. the state department sent in private contractors at a cost greater than if we would've had our troops in there. it is a fact right now, the figures don't lie, but liars figure. host: thanks for the call. guest: the president's proposal to roll back the bush tax rates for upper-income americans would raise probably about $100 billion a year. that includes higher tax rates on income earned over $250,000, higher estate taxes, and more. it's not going to solve our deficit problem, but it will have an impact. the question is, is that enough, too much, too little, when you combine it with spending cuts, to reduce the deficit to more stable level over the years? host: what we have seen in these negotiations between the principals, how does that portend in terms of what we will see in
, and president obama should be in and his entire staff, including hillary clinton. i do not know if you have noticed but nancy pelosi, her eyes are consistently dilated. host: thanks for your call. let's go to indiana. caller: i think it is unfortunate boehner wants to tax people making over $1 million. [indiscernbile] this is the result of 30 years of reaganomics, and the republican party has left people with less fiscal responsibility and they have not paid for the two wars, medicare part d, not to mention the tax cuts. host: how does it end? caller: if people did not wake up and try to do what is right for future generations at will and worse. the republican party will not compromise for anything. it is not the dwight eisenhower party that had the 93% tax rate. you put the money into the interstate highway system. even abraham lincoln created land grant universities, and that was not called socialism. it was called advancing the future. host: we appreciate the call. let's go to illinois, catherine on our line for republicans. caller: yeah, hi, this is catherine. i cannot have twitter, but
, which is let's not forget the fiscal cliff takes us back to the clinton era tax rates. i remember a lot of people on this network saying how great it was back then. we're going back to the clinton era tax rates and we boom then. the reason it didn't pinch us then, now it's deem and then it was great. i think the difference is the economy was improving, incomes were going up, housing prices were going up, people felt better. home prices are going up. that's a good thing, and the income issue is where we need to solve the problem. >> that's right. >> people can handle higher taxes if they make more money. part of that -- i'm going to get preachy here, reverend. the american people have to make a decision about what's important. keeping your neighbors employed. i know cost matters to a lot of people. my parents poet grew up poor. look the at what you buying if it koths made in mechanic and kips your neighbor working at a higher wage at a u.s. facility, think about that decision you're pak maiking. there's no country in the world -- sorry i'm off on a tangent. there's no country in the worl
schools. cops in the school program was initiated in the 1990s by bill clinton. whether an individual school wants that protection or doesn't want that protection is really up to the individual school and when we made that statement, whether wayne la pierre spoke a week ago, what has to happen and should happen is in every school district, administrators, teacher skpes parents should sit down and ask what's needed to protect the students in that school. others want private security guards. there may be places where they want volunteers to do it. we are willing to work with everybody on the questions. >> how do educators feel about giving teachers firearms training? bob hinky is a principal at mountain crest high school. how do you feel about this? >> well, i think the teachers have that right and so i feel like it's okay, but i have some things i'm very concerned about. i personally wouldn't carry a gun or get a concealed weapon myself. the concerns i have is the concealed weapons, i have a friend who just received his a couple of years ago and through the training, they never used a
of votes in 2008 by a lot of votes that were not just -- >> that is so. but clinton did quite well but only because ross perot was running. very complicated. in terms of it being a national figure, someone reaching across the aisle, you haven't seen that. one of the things that h.w. did while he was in office, he he cut a budget deal raising some taxes with some republican support. >> and that's what made his legacy as a one-term president. >> and that's what killed him. but he was at that turning point when conservatives were no longer willing to accept that. conservatives didn't complain so much earn him. so things were changing the the point being we've moved on from that period in which you can have that sen trit government leadership. >> views have changed. it does look like we could be headed over the cliff. we don't have much time left. we'll see retroactively if that allows for a deal to be reached. >> yes. >> tim stanley, going through all of this with us. an author, as well. >> merry christmas. >> and to you. >>> now, former u.s. president is. >> intensive care at a houston hospit
repeals, and the repeal for those who don't know was signed by bill clinton as president. helping to deregulate. what did we have? the taxes on the rich were gone ridge of, taxes on corporations were reduced, regulations on business were gone ridge of. what is it we saw? we saw that by not changing the organization of capitalist enterprise, we left in place people with the incentives and the resources to undo everything that had been achieved in the great depression. we learned a powerful lesson. it is like winning a war but leaving the enemy with other armaments. they might use their weapons to try again. if you leave in place a corporate capitalist structure, a small group of major shareholders will own the shares in their hands. d. a. therefore select the board of directors and remember what a board of directors does in every corporation, it decides what to produce, how to produce, where to produce and what to do with the profits. for americans this struck a moral political issue. we are in a country which claims it is committed to democracy. we say that about our political act
is it enough? what should that 40% share be from the top 1%? >> the clinton rate was 39%. dennis: share of tax dollars. >> overall share, how do you measure that? the fact is you equate in terms of wealth as opposed to income is even greater. a small percentage of americans own all the wealth. i thought you were talking about marginal tax rates. if it was marginal tax rates we're doing fine -- dennis: the bottom half of earners pay zero federal income-tax. they pay sales taxes and% income-tax. [talking over each other] >> they pay less than nothing because we get earned income tax credit. dennis: all right, sounds good to me. [talking over each other] dennis: we will cut you down. shibani: the fiscal cliff survival kit is here. the market's jump in and fiscal cliff years. what should you do to protect your money, your portfolio, your sanity, your 401(k)? joining us is president and ceo of shaver asset management dan shaffer. good to have you on this friday, big day for the market. all these talks, i noticed movement in bond prices. in the currency market, what is your technical analysis tellin
question about hair. you have covered hillary clinton. there is enormous chatter about her hair. >> this is so annoying. it goes back to the head and in 1992. -- it goes back to the headband in 1992. "washington post" has a new poll indicating her strong popularity. i cover her. i see the pluses and minuses, the good, bad, whatever. she is big things in this transition. when she was running for senate, it was not evident the former first lady could do that job. she came in quietly under the radar. there were than 13 women in the senate. she became a team player and developed key alliance. she proved herself to the point where she was considered a credible national candidate. she came in second for the nomination and ran a strong campaign. i think she has inspired a lot of people and worked very hard. the rest of her story is yet to be told. her hair is the least important thing about her. >> polls are showing her very high. that can coexist with people you have enormous respect for. >> what if instead of going to meetings and working hard, she was getting fluffed? then we would
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)